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PPT Karaoke

Present like a pro, even when you don't know what's coming next

PLAYERS

Min:

2

Max:

40

Ideal:

12

EXPERIENCE

Game / Round Time:

30

/

10

Physical / Virtual:

Yes

/

Yes

COMPLEXITY

To Play:

Easy

To Facilitate:

Easy

To Customize:

Medium

MATRIX

Instinct:

Feel

Intent:

Why

CLASS

Genre:

Party, Social

Mechanics:

Chance, Improvisation, Presentation, Real-time, Role-playing, Turn-based, Voting,

Dynamics:

Adaptability, Application, Communication, Confidence, Creativity, Empathy, Feedback, Listening, Multitasking, Persuasion, Professionalism, Public Speaking, Resourcefulness, Risk-taking, Strategy Development, Time Management,

BONDING

Materials

VIRTUAL SETUP

+ presentation slides (the more random, the better)

Physical Setup

First, assemble the slides for the game or use a premade deck. The key to success is that the slides have a surprise factor. They don't have to be complicated. Sometimes simple images can do the trick.

Next, determine a presentation order. This could be individuals or teams.

Finally, project or share the screen for everyone to see.



Virtual Setup

Since the game just requires a shared presentation screen, it is easy to adapt digitally. Either have players progress the slides themselves or let a facilitator control the pace.

Gameplay

Round 1: Show the first slide. The first player or team has a set amount of time (i.e. 30-60 seconds) to present what's on the slide. When the time is up, the next slide and player/team presents.

Round 2+: When everyone has presented, either continue in the same way or consider adding some other layers (see game variants)

Endgame: The main goal is laughter, but there are some competitive options to determine winners, such as favorite or most impressive performances.

Variations

Battle: Pit individuals or groups against each other in a back and forth presentation, using slides as transitions between people.

Secret Word: Presenters pick from a container of random words that they must sneak into their pitch without others noticing. The group votes at the end.

Random Topic: Instead of secret words, the presentation itself must be about the word, regardless of the accompanying slides.

Pulse Check

Q. Does everyone seem open to keep playing? Are the disengaged able to be more engaged?

Q. Are people having fun — smiling, laughing, in deep thought?

Q. Do you hear productive strategizing about how to improve round-to-round?

BUILDING

Feel

Position the reflection around sensory and emotional responses to certain options or ideas:


  • Were you satisfied with the level of engagement from your team members?

  • What made you feel respected and valued during the game?

  • When did the game have the most energy? The most tension?

Why

Position the reflection around goals and metrics, as well as the skills and roles to succeed:


  • What is one thing about you that would help your team members work with you better?

  • Did this game give you ideas about how to better advocate for yourself?

  • What strengths and talents did you witness, and how could the team better leverage them?

DEVELOPMENT

Please reach out to us for support around positioning this game for deeper learning programs and longer engagements. We often find that lighter game sessions can help set up team assessments and heavier reflections that lead to growth.

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